Advocacy

The US-China Business Council (USCBC) supports a strong, mutually beneficial commercial relationship with China. The relationship has made many positive strides over the past three decades, thanks to the collaborative work of the governments, business communities, and other stakeholders in both countries.

USCBC's board of directors first issued a priorities statement in February 2012. Progress has been made on a number of the statement's recommendations. More work needs to be done on several other issues highlighted in that statement, and new issues have arisen that require the attention of both governments in order to fully develop commercial ties, tackle unresolved issues, and bring greater benefit to each country's economy, companies, employees, farmers, and consumers.

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Members of the US-China Business Council enjoy full access to research on the Chinese trade and investment environment, as well as newsletters and analyses on political decisions that affect US business operations.


 

USCBC comments and recommendations on various regulatory issues influencing the US-China commercial relationship.

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Understanding what BITs do and don’t do is important. The United States and China—the world’s two largest economies—are currently negotiating a BIT, making the issue particularly relevant today.

A BIT is an agreement between two countries that sets up “rules of the road” for foreign investment in each other’s countries. BITs give US investors better access to foreign markets—and on fairer terms. The United States currently has BITs with 42 countries.

A high-quality US-China BIT would give American companies better access to China’s market, and equal rights as Chinese firms. These guarantees would provide American companies with a better opportunity to expand in China – the world’s second largest economy, with a middle class that will soon be larger than the population of the United States.

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USCBC regularly provides remarks on Chinese business issues to US and Chinese government leaders.

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