China Market Intelligence

February 8th, 2017
by Erin Ennis and Jake Laband

Over the past year, China has implemented a variety of restrictions to stem capital flight in response to downward pressure on the renminbi (RMB). These restrictions have affected foreign companies’ routine business operations, including receiving payments from domestic customers, as well as the payment of dividends, royalties, and even routine trade payments overseas.

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February 8th, 2017
Meg Kelly

In the first two weeks of the Trump administration, there has been a great deal of discussion of policies affecting trade, though formal proposals have not yet been made on most of them.  Administration officials have suggested a proposed border tax on imports from certain countries, and made repeated calls to increase domestic manufacturing, but so far, there has been no action regarding alleged currency...

February 8th, 2017
by Erin Ennis

Increased staffing at US consular offices in China due to previous changes to US business visas might mitigate potential delays in visa renewals  affected by changes to US immigration rules.

 

Trump’s executive order on January 27...

February 8th, 2017
by Maryan Escarfullett

Wholly foreign-owned enterprise (WFOE) wealth management firms can now directly invest in the Chinese market as a result of new licensing reforms. This positive step in the liberalization of the Chinese economy will allow WFOEs to compete with domestic counterparts and eliminate the need to partner with a local joint venture (JV) for onshore investment.

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February 8th, 2017
by Meg Kelly

Reduced regulation and increased energy production are the pillars of the Trump administration’s economic plan, according Stephen Moore, a visiting fellow at the Heritage Foundation and economic advisor to President Trump during his campaign.

Moore, who addressed the US-China Business Council (USCBC) Forecast conference...

February 8th, 2017
by Anna Ashton

The Trump administration is expected to take a less patient and conciliatory approach to US-China trade relations than has been the norm in recent years; but with its own significant political transition underway, China is unlikely to make major domestic policy changes in response to a more hardline US approach. A panel of experts invited to the US-China Business Council on February 2 forecast the political...

January 25th, 2017
By Yan Yu and Melinda Xu

China’s lead Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT) negotiator earned a promotion as part of China’s wave of leadership changes at central and local-level government agencies in the run up to November's leadership transition.

 

Li...

January 25th, 2017
By Melinda Xu

The 2012 launch of China’s anticorruption campaign has renewed US companies’ attention to anti-bribery, competition, and corruption-related policies and regulations. The challenges of compliance have continued to evolve since the US-China Business Council’s (USCBC) 2013 Compliance Best Practices Report, as China has promulgated new local laws and regulations. As USCBC members work to ensure compliance, however...

January 25th, 2017
By Jake Parker

Limited progress on State Owned Enterprise (SOE) reform continues to undermine US industry’s confidence in China’s policy direction, but recent announcements limiting SOE outbound investment might be beneficial. Since December, Chinese regulators have increased scrutiny of SOE outbound investment plans, limiting the size and types of permitted deals because of the downward pressure on the renminbi (RMB)....

January 25th, 2017
By Owen Haacke

Costs of complying with China’s environmental protection laws are rising as companies operating there face higher compliance costs, more frequent inspections, and a swath of new laws and regulations on emissions. Already held to high expectations of energy efficiency and low emissions, companies operating in China should prepare for inevitably stricter standards to come.

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