What do Commerce’s new export control restrictions mean for business with China?

The Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) recently released two final rules and a proposed rule aimed at broadening the scope of export restrictions on dual-use technology to China. BIS expanded the scope of export restrictions for “military end use” and “military end users” in China, removed a Civil End Users (CIV) license exemption to require a case-by-case review of the export of certain controlled technologies to China, and proposed narrowing a license exception for Additional Permissive Reexports (APR), which allows US allies to re-export certain US technology to other countries, including China, without BIS review. What are the potential impacts of these changes to companies with operations in China? What are the additional compliance implications? What questions should companies be asking internally and of their counterparties to assess their exposure? And how could the proposed change to the APR license exception impact the global alliance structure?

Please join the USCBC for a discussion with legal and export control compliance experts John Larkin, Peter Lichtenbaum, and Alexis Early for a discussion on the implications of these new changes and what companies should be doing to assess and prepare.

This call will take place on Friday May 15 at 10:00am EDT in the United States and 10:00pm in China.

This event is for USCBC member companies and invited guests only. Registration is required. Dial-in information will be provided upon registration approval on Thursday, May 14 at 3:00pm EDT

The Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) released two final rules and a proposed rule aimed at broadening the scope of export restrictions on dual-use technology to China. BIS expanded the scope of export restrictions for “military end use” and “military end users” in China, removed a Civil End Users (CIV) license exemption to require a case-by-case review of the export of certain controlled technologies to China, and proposed narrowing a license exception for Additional Permissive Reexports (APR), which allows US allies to re-export certain US technology to other countries, including China, without BIS review. What are the potential impacts of these changes to companies with operations in China? What are the additional compliance implications? What questions should companies be asking internally and of their counterparties to assess their exposure? And how could the proposed change to the APR license exception impact the global alliance structure?

Legal and export control compliance experts John Larkin, Peter Lichtenbaum, and Alexis Early led a discussion on the implications of these changes and what companies should be doing to assess and prepare.

Event Details

When:
Friday, May 15, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Registration

Deadline:
Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 2:00pm
Cost:
Free

Event Contact

Contact:
Vivian Zhu
Phone:
202-429-0340 ext. 208