Washington Update

January 18th, 2019
By Angela Deng

High-level bilateral talks scheduled for end of January

The Chinese government confirmed on Thursday that Vice Premier Liu He will visit the United States from January 30 to 31 to continue the bilateral trade talks that began at the vice-ministerial level from January 7 to 9. China’s Ministry of Commerce Spokesman Gao Feng offered no other details on Liu He’s agenda in Washington, except that both countries will try to implement the common understanding reached by...

January 11th, 2019

US-China trade talks review substantive issues, but no outcomes to date

Trade negotiations between the United States and China this week covered both structural issues and the trade balance. While no agreement was reached—nor was one expected—the substantive discussions laid the groundwork for further negotiations on the most difficult bilateral trade issues.

US-China Business Council sources indicate that the talks were extended to a third day to...

January 5th, 2016
Stephanie Henry

January 5, 2015

Congress’ approval of the 2016 Omnibus spending bill on December 18 contained one significant, positive measure for the US-China relationship: an increase in China’s stake in the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Congress had delayed voting on an IMF reform package for several years, leading some critics in China to view the inaction as part of a containment strategy to limit China’s influence in international institutions.
 
IMF reform had been a long-...

October 1st, 2014
Stephanie Henry

Erin Ennis, vice president of the US-China Business Council (USCBC), testified today before the interagency Trade Policy Staff Committee on a wide range of issues, including competition enforcement, regulatory transparency, intellectual property rights (IPR), and China’s broader compliance with its World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments.

In her testimony, Ennis said China remains a valuable market for US companies, but one that could be more valuable if market barriers and...

January 14th, 2014
Stephanie Henry

The US-China Business Council today called on the White House and congressional leaders to oppose counterproductive language expected to be included in 2014 fiscal year appropriations that bars the Departments of Commerce and Justice, NASA, and the National Science Foundation from purchasing information technology (IT) systems from China without first conducting a cyber-espionage or sabotage risk assessment. The letter states that the rule “does little to improve the security of the US...